Colors that are not supposed to exist Chimerical, Stygian, Hyperbolic

Chimerical colours don’t appear within the colour space of human vision. As the name suggests they are a construct of the mind. They can be created by inducing a natural process of the eye called colour fatigue. If you stare at a colour for a long time your eye will temporarily displace the colourspace by the opposing colour. So if you stare at yellow, then black, for a short time you will perceive that black to contain blue. The colour you are seeing is out of the range of visible colours. It is a pitch black blue; thus it is deemed an impossible colour. Above are a number of examples of chimerical colours to feast your eyes upon. Continue to stare (without shifting your eyes) at one of the many crosses as the image changes.

When the image changes, the impossible colours should be revealed. Some people will see the colours more easily than others. The above image is on a 30 second delay which seems the best to view the chimera. The brightness of the device you are using to view the images will make a huge difference to the effectiveness, and also the effect will vary from person to person. The intensity of the effect increases with longer viewing durations. Chimerical colours don’t appear within the colour space of human vision. They are a construct of the mind. They can be created by inducing a natural process of the eye called colour fatigue. If you stare at a colour for a long time your eye will temporarily displace the colour space by the opposing colour. So if you stare at yellow, then black, for a short time you will perceive that black to contain blue. The colour you are seeing is out of the range of visible colors.
Chimerical colors include:

Stygian colors: these are simultaneously dark and impossibly saturated. For example, to see "stygian blue": staring at bright yellow causes a dark blue afterimage, then on looking at black, the blue is seen as blue against the black, but due to lack of the usual brightness contrast it seems to be as dark as the black. The eye retina contains some neurons that fire only in the dark. The figure below figure also shows how normal after-image colors are produced. (The "f/p" in this figure stands for fatigue/potentiation.) Look at the "Acquired f/p vectors" which show that when a particular color is stared at for a long time, the opponent cells become fatigued and tend towards the middle of the cube (towards the 50%, 50%, 50% point). Then when the eye glances away to a different color background, that vector starts at the new color and points to the after-image color (see the "Re-situated f/p vector"). This example shows that the after-image color for red is green. Churchland goes on to explain that this theory can predict that it is possible to create a number of after-image colors that would be impossible to see on a real objects. The following diagram shows how to create a blue after-image color that is darker than black (Stygian Blue)


Self-luminous colors: these mimic the effect of a glowing material, even when viewed on a medium such as paper, which can only reflect and not emit its own light. For example, to see "self-luminous red": staring at green causes a red afterimage, then on looking at white, the red is seen against the white and may seem to be brighter than the white.

Hyperbolic colors: these are impossibly highly saturated. For example, to see "hyperbolic orange": staring at bright cyan causes an orange afterimage, then on looking at orange, the resulting orange afterimage seen against the orange background may cause an orange color purer than the purest orange color that can be made by any normally-seen light. Or, staring at something pure magenta in bright sunlight for two minutes or more, and then looking at green leaves, may result in briefly seeing an unnaturally pure green afterimage.
sources: Wittgenstein on color, Goethe on color, Zachary Bosfrank, Heile, Wikipedia, Lindsay Kolowich, heDevilBehindTheLeaves, Aaron. 

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